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2011 News

  • An Evening with Benjamin Franklin

    Wednesday, January 12,
    Half Past 7 o' clock, Booth Library Atrium

    An Evening with Benjamin Franklin
    Fred Krebs, Professor of History, Johnson County Community College

    Join Benjamin Franklin, portrayed by Fred Krebs, as he reminisces about his life and pursuit of a better world. Get to know Ben as he talks about his views on self-improvement, virtues, and religion. Discover firsthand the work he did in Philadelphia to create civic institutions and how he led the colonies to independence, at home and abroad. Share in the excitement as he talks about his inventions. There will be plenty of time for you to ask Ben Franklin any questions you have about his life and work.

    Fred Krebs is a professor of history at Johnson County Community College in Overland Park, Kansas. Since 1985 Krebs has made history come alive for his classes and other audiences. Krebs has been an active Chautauqua speaker participating in Chautauqua programs in 16 different states with over 15 different historical characterizations and has donned the costume and delivered presentations as Benjamin Franklin more than 100 times. His recognitions include the "Patriot of the Year" in 2001 awarded by the Sons of the American Revolution and a Kansas Humanities Council Humanities Award for connecting people and ideas for more than 25 years in Kansas. He has also been honored with the Governor's Humanist of the Year award. Krebs has received degrees from the University of Kansas and the University of Missouri at Kansas City.

  • Revisioning the Folksy Founder

    Tuesday, January 18
    7 o' clock, Booth Library Conference Room 4440

    Revisioning the Folksy Founder: Benjamin Franklin and the Creation of the American Republic
    Terry Barnhart, Professor of History

    The presentation focuses on the sources of Franklin's political philosophy, his ideas about creating an American Union, his role as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1787, and his views on slavery. Franklin's contributions as a founding father are juxtaposed with the Franklin of myth, by comparing and contrasting how Franklin's contemporaries viewed him with his iconic stature among later generations of Americans. Several generations of historians have constructed divergent interpretations of Franklin, a process of revisioning and revising our understanding of the man and his world that will most certainly continue.

    Terry A. Barnhart is professor of history at Eastern Illinois University. Since joining the faculty in 1994 he has taught the U.S. history survey, the U.S. Constitution and the Nation course, and graduate courses in both the M.A. in Historical Administration program and the M.A. in History program. His many interests include the resolved and unresolved issue and problems facing the new nation during the Confederation period (1778-1788) and those that continued to beset the republic from the ratification of the Constitution in 1789 to the American Civil War. Dr. Barnhart received the Ph.D. in History from Miami University in 1989, and the M.A. in History and the B.S. in Education from Miami in 1980 and 1975 respectively.

  • General Library Tours

    Booth Library is offering library orientation tours between January 10 February 23. The Library is closed on January 17, so there will be no tour that day. Tours meet in the library's North Foyer at the following times:

    Mondays 6:00 p.m.
    Tuesdays 11:00 a.m.
    Wednesdays 5:00 p.m.

    Sessions last approximately 45 minutes. All are welcome to attend. To take a tour, simply go to the Marvin Foyer (inside the north entrance) in Booth Library at the scheduled time. Registration is not required for general tours.
  • Benjamin Franklin's Standup Comic

    RESCHEDULED Thursday, January 27
    4 o' clock, Booth Library Conference Room 4440

    Benjamin Franklin's Standup Comic: The Speech of Miss Polly Baker
    Parley Ann Boswell, Professor of English

    In Franklin's "Speech of Miss Polly Baker" (1747), Polly Baker, a New England mother about to be sentenced in court for delivering her fifth illegitimate child, delivers instead a short defense in which she turns every argument for her prosecution on its head. Franklin, 41 years old when he created Polly Baker, and himself the father of an illegitimate child at the time, never identified himself as the author of this essay. 20th-century scholars proved Franklin's authorship, often citing the essay as an example of his condemnation of Puritan hypocrisy or his attempt to imitate early English novelists. In 2010, however, we might also argue that Franklin's Polly represents more than criticism or imitation: "Polly Baker" represents a prototype of American performance art. Franklin clearly understood narrative voice and persona, and he also recognized that the most effective way to speak truth to power was through comedy. "The Speech of Polly Baker" anticipates a rich heritage of popular American monologues and performances that confront institutional hypocrisy, gender hypocrisy, etc. through good timing and laughter. Franklin's talented Polly Baker might be in good company with any number of contemporary comedy artists and characters, including Rosanne Barr, Flip Wilson's Geraldine, Candace Bergen's Murphy Brown, or Diablo Cody's Juno.

    Parley Ann Boswell is a professor of English at Eastern, where she teaches courses in American Literature and Film Studies. She received her M.A. in colonial American history from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a Ph.D. in English from Loyola University.

  • Tax Forms

    Copies of all major federal and Illinois state tax forms and booklets are available in the Reference Area of the library. Additional specialized forms are available for photocopying. Online tax forms are also available.
  • Storytime: Happy 305th Birthday, Benjamin!

    Saturday, January 22,
    10 o' clock, Ballenger Teachers Center

    Happy 305th Birthday, Benjamin!
    Jeanne Goble and Ann Brownson

    The Ballenger Teachers Center will celebrate Benjamin Franklin's birthday through a variety of crafts and stories. The celebration is expected to last about one hour. Find out the "Ben"efits of being Benjamin Franklin! Children ages 3-6, accompanied by an adult, are invited.

  • Storytime for Spring 2011

    The Ballenger Teachers Center at Booth Library holds storytimes, with craft activities, for children ages 3 to 6 and accompanied by parents for six-week sessions in the fall and spring semesters.

    The storytimes for Spring 2011 are: Saturdays, January 22 and 29; February 5, 12, 19, and 26; and March 5. All storytimes begin at 10 a.m. and last about an hour. Please contact Ann Brownson at aebrownson@eiu.edu or 581-8442 for further information.

  • Benjamin Franklin and the Army

    Wednesday, January 26,
    4 o' clock, Booth Library Conference Room 4440

    Benjamin Franklin and the Army
    Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Knotts, Professor and Chair of Military Science

    The presentation focuses on Benjamin Franklin's support of the Revolutionary War effort in the areas of supply and logistics and the similarities of today's logistics procurement process. Franklin well understood the hardships of the soldier from his own experiences in the French and Indian War, as well as the risks of an ill-equipped army in surviving as a military force. His experience in commerce and communication in the Colonies and his position as Ambassador to France enabled him to support the army with necessary resources to fight a war. The presentation ends with a comparison of how the United States supports its Army today.

    Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Knotts is a 20-year veteran of the US Army and Chairman of Military Science at Eastern Illinois University. In his Army career, LTC Knotts has deployed to Haiti and twice to Operation Iraqi Freedom and has supported Army logistics operations from procurement to the front lines. Assigned to Eastern Illinois University ROTC, he is in his second year of developing the next generation of critical thinkers and ethical decision makers of the US Army.LTC Knotts received an M.A. in Management from Webster University in 2002, and a B.A in History from Xavier University in 1990. His military education includes the Artillery Officer's Basic Course, Logistics Officers Advance Course, and the Command General and Staff Course.

  • The Franklin Tree RESCHEDULED

    Monday, February 7
    4 o' clock, Booth Library Conference Room 4440

    The Franklin Tree: History and Local Cultivation
    Wesley Whiteside, Professor Emeritus of Botany

    A small grove of Franklinia altamaha, commonly known as the Franklin tree, was discovered in Georgia in 1765 by John Bartram and his son William. The seeds they collected and propagated became the source for all known specimens of Franklinia existing today. This small, unusual woody plant is prized for its beautiful flowers, leaves and seeds. It is easy to propagate from both seeds and cuttings, but famously difficult to cultivate. Almost fifty years ago, Dr. Wesley Whiteside took up the challenge of growing this plant at his five-acre botanical garden east of Charleston. He had many casualties along the way, but now has a thriving grove of twelve plants, several of which are ten or more feet in height. Dr. Whiteside will discuss the history of this rare and beautiful plant, how it came to be named for Benjamin Franklin, and his own experiences in cultivating it here in the Charleston area.

    Wesley Whiteside is an emeritus professor of botany at Eastern Illinois University. He is known for his five-acre botanical garden east of Charleston, where he cultivates a variety of unique plants, including Franklinia altamaha. On Memorial Day weekends, he hosts a Garden Ramble on his property as a fund raiser for the Coles County Historical Society. He also serves as a member of the Charleston Tree Commission.

  • Benjamin Franklin: Inventor

    Thursday, February 3,
    4 o' clock, Booth Library Conference Room 4440

    Benjamin Franklin: Inventor
    Steven Daniels, Professor and Chair of Physics

    Benjamin Franklin was a problem solver. He put this approach to life to use in a number of areas; politics, weather, writing, and inventing. He came across a number of problems in his life that required some form of invention to get around. In the process he became an important inventor in early American history. This talk will cover a number of inventions attributed to Franklin with some of the science behind them. Many people learn that Franklin invented electricity and we will examine the meaning of that claim through discussion and also through demonstration. Some other "inventions" that are attributed to Franklin will be discussed too. The pragmatism, knowledge base, and cleverness of Ben Franklin propelled him to become an inventor in a number of different areas.

    Dr. Steven Daniels is a Physics professor as well as Department Chair at Eastern Illinois University. A sampling of the various activities Dr. Daniels has participated in during his career is that Dr. Daniels has been a rocket scientist on a NASA grant, he has worked on a nuclear energy project for the Department of Energy, he has worked on problems related to ordinance as well as nuclear batteries for the Department of Defense, and has studied solar flares using a satellite for the Navy. Dr. Daniels came to EIU in 1991. His area of interest now is optics with specific interest in lasers. He received his B.A. degree from Swarthmore College and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Maryland. He also received an M.B.A. from EIU.

  • Benjamin Franklin and Freemasonry

    Wednesday, February 9,
    12 o' clock, Booth Library Conference Room 4440

    Benjamin Franklin and Freemasonry
    Michael Shirley, Instructor of History

    Benjamin Franklin was actively involved in Freemasonry for over fifty years, wrote the first Masonic ritual used in the American colonies, was Grand Master of Pennsylvania, and joined lodges in Paris while working there as a diplomat. Popular myths have obscured Freemasonry's practical and philosophical role in Franklin's life; it was less conspiratorial than Hollywood blockbusters and best-selling novelists would prefer.

    Michael Shirley, who holds a B.A. in history from Beloit College, an M.S. in Education and Social Policy from Northwestern University, a J.D. from the George Washington University, and an A.M. and Ph.D. in history from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has taught at Eastern Illinois University since 1998. He has been a Freemason since 2006.

  • Film - Benjamin Franklin: The Chess Master

    Tuesday, February 8,
    7 o' clock, Booth Library Conference Room 4440

    Film Screening - Benjamin Franklin: The Chess Master (2002)
    David Bell, Booth Library, Moderator

    Franklin, by far the oldest of the principal leaders of the American Revolution, embarks upon the most important role of his life. Congress sends Franklin to France in a desperate effort to secure an alliance with England's greatest rival. All of Franklin's considerable political skills - his talent for propaganda, public relations, back-room strategizing, his gift for subterfuge and manipulation - are called into play as he tries to convince the French to lend support to the Revolutionary cause. Despite the French king's reluctance, and backbiting from John Adams, Franklin succeeds in obtaining the French support that leads to an American victory at Yorktown. Two years later, the elderly Franklin is carried into the Constitutional Convention to guide the rancorous delegates debating the balance of states' rights and federal power that will be embodied in the Constitution.

  • Billings and Morgan: New Music for a New World

    Tuesday, February 15,
    4 o' clock, Booth Library Conference Room 4440

    William Billings and Justin Morgan: New Music for a New World
    Patricia Poulter, Professor of Music and Interim Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Humanities
    Elaine Fine
    Allen Lanham, Ph.D., Dean of Library Services

    William Billings (1746-1800), best known as the father of American choral music, was actually a tanner by trade with no formal musical training. Billings' The New-England Psalm-Singer was the first book of American choral music ever published. As evidence of the relatively small society of the day, Billings' friend Paul Revere engraved the frontispiece for the book. Justin Morgan (1747-1798), best known for developing the Morgan horse breed, was also a popular composer of the time. Like Billings, he was a singing teacher and viewed creating a new style of music as part of his patriotic duty. Examples of music by Billings, Morgan, and their contemporaries will be performed, along with a discussion about the roles their music played in the emerging democracy.

    Patricia Poulter is the Interim Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Humanities and a Professor of music at EIU, where she has been on the faculty since 1994. Dr. Poulter holds am Ed.D. in music from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, an M.A. in choral conducting, and a B.Mus. with teacher certification from Eastern.

    Elaine Fine began musical life as a violinist, but received a Bachelor of Music Degree in flute performance from The Juilliard School of Music. In addition to being on the reviewing staff of the American Record Guide since 1993, she is the program annotator for the New Philharmonic of DuPage County, and teaches at Lake Land College, in Mattoon, Illinois. She has over 70 pieces of published chamber music and has written many other pieces.

    Allen Lanham is Dean of Library Services at Eastern Illinois University. He is the president-elect of the Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI), and a trustee of the Lincoln Trail Libraries System and the Charleston Carnegie Public Library. He holds library science or music degrees from the University of Rochester, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Arkansas State University, and Murray State University.

  • Franklin, Women, and Writing

    Thursday, February 17,
    7 o' clock, Booth Library Conference Room 4440

    Franklin, Women, and Writing
    Angela Vietto, Associate Professor of English

    Franklin's first published writings, the Silence Dogood letters, were written in the voice of a middle-aged woman, and in his Autobiography, Franklin claims that his first persuasive writings were a series of letters to a friend defending women's education. From these early forays as a writer into his later years, Franklin's relations with women, both in life and on paper, offer insights into both Franklin and the eighteenth-century world of women. This talk will explore some of the ways Franklin's writing and life can help us understand the situation of women in post-revolutionary America.

    Angela Vietto teaches American literature, with emphasis on the early Republic and the history of authorship. She is completing an edition of both the novels of Hannah Webster Foster, co-edited with Jennifer Desiderio, under contract with Broadview Press. Other ongoing research interests include women writers of the 1790s-1820s, gendered issues in early writing instruction, and emerging literary criticism just after the Revolution.

  • What if Ben could tweet?

    Monday, February 21, 2011,
    7 o'clock, Booth Library Conference Room

    What if Ben could tweet? The digital revolution meets the American Revolution!
    Marie Fero, Assistant Professor of Early Childhood, Elementary and Middle-Level Education
    Sheila Lambert, Title I Reading Teacher, Arland D. Williams Junior Elementary, Mattoon

    This presentation will be a fun exploration of how Ben Franklin may have used various digital media in his 18th century world.

    Dr. Fero, assistant professor of early childhood, elementary and middle level education at Eastern Illinois University holds degrees in music, elementary education, and educational leadership. She has served as a teacher of K-12 music, elementary classroom, Title I classroom, and gifted education. She has been an elementary principal, chair of education, and an instructor of teacher education at six institutions around the country.

    Sheila Lambert is a Title I reading teacher at Arland D. Williams Junior Elementary in the Mattoon Community Unit School District #2. She holds both a B.S. and M.S. in elementary education from Eastern Illinois University.

  • Benjamin Franklin: Architect of American Journalism

    Wednesday, February 23,
    4 o' clock, Booth Library Conference Room 4440

    Benjamin Franklin: Architect of American Journalism
    Lola Burnham, Assistant Professor of Journalism
    Sally Renaud, Associate Professor of Journalism
    Liz Viall, Instructor of Journalism

    Benjamin Franklin is known as a diplomat, a scientist, a writer, and as one of our country's Founding Fathers. He has also had a lasting impact on American journalism through his writings, through his influence on the distribution of newspapers, and through his business partnerships in printing. EIU Department of Journalism faculty will discuss these facets of Franklin's journalism career and relate them to present day industry practice.

    Lola Burnham is an assistant professor of journalism at Eastern Illinois University and is editorial adviser to The Daily Eastern News. She holds a Bachelor's degree in journalism and a Master's degree in English.

    Sally Renaud teaches journalism and advises the yearbook staff at Eastern Illinois University. She received her Bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Missouri and her Ph.D. from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.

    Liz Viall is an instructor of journalism at EIU. She teaches courses in news writing, visual communication, publication design, and publicity methods. Her research focuses on citizen journalism and technology issues in communication. She received her Ph.D. in Mass Communication from Indiana University, a Master's in Journalism from the University of Alabama, and has undergraduate degrees in government and journalism.

  • Tax Forms

    Copies of all major federal and Illinois state tax forms and booklets are available in the Reference Area of the library. Additional specialized forms are available for photocopying. Online tax forms are also available.
  • Franklin on the Question of Race

    Friday, February 25,
    3 o' clock, Booth Library Conference Room 4440

    Benjamin Franklin on the Question of Race
    Klevor Abo, Instructor of African American Studies

    Like most, if not all, the Founding Fathers, Benjamin Franklin was concerned and expressed thoughts on what the racial composition of the United States should be. This presentation offers a reading of Benjamin Franklin's thoughts on the question. The most explicit of these thoughts are presented in Franklin's essay, "Observations Concerning the Increase of Mankind, Peopling of Countries, etc." which is read contextually in terms of Franklin's attitudes towards Native Americans, Black folk, both free and enslaved, and new German immigrants to Pennsylvania.

    Klevor Abo teaches in the African American Studies Program at EIU. His interest in the history of race relations derives from the focus of his research into the nature and character of the relationship between Africa and its diasporas. He studied at the University of Ghana (bachelor of arts in music, English, linguistics and african studies), Goldsmith's College, University of London (MMus, Ethnomusicology) and Bowling Green State University, Ohio (Ph.D. American culture studies).

  • 150th Anniversary of Lincoln's Inauguration

    An exhibit is on display in Booth Library's south lobby commemorating the150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's inauguration as president on March 4, 1861. Bradley Tolppanen is the curator.
  • Women and the Environment

    In keeping with the theme of this year's Women's History Month celebrations (March, 2011), the exhibits in the North foyer of the Booth Library highlight women leaders from around the world fighting for their environment. On one side are leaders from around the world and their biographical information set up in an interactive format along with images of globes from a public art exhibitions set up in various cities. On the other side are book covers from women authors who have written about the environment for various audiences including children. Quotes from well-known environmentalists are also included in this display case. The displays were put together by Dr. Jeanne Okrasinski and Dr. Kiran Padmaraju with assistance from Ms. Stacey Knight-Davis.
  • Booth Library Receives Technology Improvement Award

    The Booth Library website is the key to finding books, articles, and just about everything else in the library. Each day, thousands of people go to library.eiu.edu to find information, and the computer running the website has to be ready to meet that need any time of day or night.

    In the next few weeks, the current web server at Booth Library will be replaced by a brand new machine. This project has been funded in part with Federal Funds from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under Contract No. N01-LM-6-3503 with the University of Illinois at Chicago. The Technology Improvement Award has allowed the library to purchase a very reliable web server that will allow the Library to pursue new projects.

    "Our current server is at the end of its expected lifespan, so I'm very excited to be able to replace it. The new machine will give us many more options for adding new services, and we will have to worry much less about is breaking down," said Booth Library webmaster Stacey Knight-Davis. "Just about everything on this new server has a backup system that kicks automatically in if something fails."

    The Technology Improvement Award is offered to enhance access to health information, and everyone is welcome to come in to the library and search for medical information. Reference librarians are happy to provide assistance if you are not sure where to start. For health professionals, students, and researchers, library's website provides links to PubMed, a database developed and maintained by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, at the U.S. National Library of Medicine that includes 20 million citations for biomedical literature from life science journals online books. For people that need information on diseases, medications, or search for a doctor, MedlinePlus offers reliable and up to date information that is easy to understand. For details on these resources, or any of the other services offered at Booth Library, call 581-6072.

  • Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!

    Exhibits featuring the memorable characters created by Dr. Suess are on display in the Marvin Foyer and Ballenger Teachers Center through April. Jeanne Goble is the curator, and many of the items on display are on loan from Jeni Huckstep.
  • Nutrition Education Exhibits

    Students enrolled in Nutrition Therapy through the School of Family and Consumer Sciences demonstrate the importance of nutrition in exhibits titled: Got Nuts, Grains, Legumes and Seeds, Then You've Got Milk!; Breakfast on the Run; What Are Whole Grains?; Legumes; Color Your Diet; Benefits of Lycopene; Calcium; What's Your Flavor?; Eating on a Budget; and Spring Into a Healthier You. The exhibits will be on display through March in the Marvin Foyer.
  • Online Catalog down March 13, 6:00am-10:00am

    The EIU Online Catalog, and I-Share catalog will be offline from 6:00am-10:00am Sunday, March 13. This downtime is scheduled to perform system maintenance.
  • No Off-Campus Library Access, Library Closed, Sunday, March 13

    The Booth Library web site will be unavailable on Sunday, March 13th while the power is off for scheduled maintenance. Off-campus access to most electronic resources will be unavailable during the power outage.
  • Periodical Review List

    The lists of periodical and standing order subscriptions have been compiled for campus review. The Periodical and Standing Order Review is an annual exercise designed to ensure that library collections continue to meet the needs of library users. Questions about the review can be addressed to the Reference Desk (581-6072) or individual subject librarians.
  • Annual Book Sale

    The annual book sale will be held outside the north entrance of the library on Wednesday, April 13, from 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. The library requests no advance sales. A large selection of books in all subject areas and hundreds of paperback fiction titles will be available for sale. The proceeds from the sale are used to enhance library programs and services.
  • National Poetry Month: Elizabeth Bishop

    To celebrate national poetry month, this display will highlight the life and work of American poet Elizabeth Bishop. Marvin Foyer through April 30. Curated by Janice Derr.
  • Storytime for National Library Week

    On Saturday, April 9 at 10:00 a.m., Booth Library will be hosting a special library-themed storytime in the Ballenger Teachers Center. Children ages 3 to 7 and their parents are welcome to attend this free library event.
  • Edible Book Festival

    On Monday, April 11, the library will be hosting its first-ever Edible Book Festival. The exhibit and reception will be held 5:00-7:00 p.m. in the Marvin Foyer, and all are invited to attend. An "edible book" is a work made out of food that has something to do with books in either shape or content. The edible artwork will not be served; refreshments will be provided for the reception. Prizes will be awarded to the best entries in the show.
  • Create Your Own Story @ Your Library

    Eastern Illinois University's Booth Library will be celebrating National Library Week during the week of April 10 through April 16, 2011, and will host several events and exhibitions.

    On Saturday, April 9 at 10:00 a.m., Booth Library will be hosting a special library-themed storytime in the Ballenger Teachers Center. Children ages 3 to 7 and their parents are welcome to attend this free library event.

    On Monday, April 11, the library will be hosting its first-ever Edible Book Festival. The exhibit and reception will be held 5:00-7:00 p.m. in the Marvin Foyer, and all are invited to attend. An "edible book" is a work made out of food that has something to do with books in either shape or content. The edible artwork will not be served; refreshments will be provided for the reception. Prizes will be awarded to the best entries in the show.

    The annual book sale will be held outside the north entrance of the library on Wednesday, April 13, from 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. The library requests no advance sales. A large selection of books in all subject areas and hundreds of paperback fiction titles will be available for sale. All items have been donated by the campus community. The proceeds from the sale are used to enhance library programs and services.

    Also on Wednesday, April 13, Booth Library will be joining other libraries from around Illinois in "Snapshot: One Day in the Life of Your Library," documenting how libraries impact the lives of their users.

    For more information, contact Ellen Corrigan, National Library Week Committee Chair, at (217) 581-8456 or ekcorrigan@eiu.edu.

  • School of Technology Exhibit

    This School of Technology exhibit demonstrates the integrative learning techniques employed by School of Technology faculty. Laboratories in the school are equipped to enable integrative learning in numerous technology areas including digital printing, automation and control, computer-integrated manufacturing, construction, materials and polymers. The exhibit highlights faculty perspectives with images from the technology program and quotes from the faculty. The example materials provide the viewer with a sense of the "hands-on" learning that students can expect in the School of Technology. The exhibit is on display in the south lobby through April 30. Curated by Todd Bruns.
  • Booth Library’s first Edible Book Festival

    The first Edible Book Festival was a great success. There were 26 entries, including pieces from library staff, students, faculty, and retirees. The entries ran the gamut from whimsical to thought-provoking, and there was a very high level of creativity and craftsmanship.

    Photos from the event are available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/8698237@N02/sets/72157626975820510/

    Festival attendees could vote for their favorite exhibit and due to the high quality of the pieces nearly every entry received votes. There were so many quality entries that we decided that next year we should have awards in more categories. This year the winners were:

    Dean's Choice Award - "The Sexual Politics of Meat" by Ellen Corrigan Dean's Choice Award Runner-Up - "Naked Lunch" by Stacey Knight-Davis

    People's Choice Award (Most Votes) - "Stone Soup" by Jacqui Worden People's Choice Award Runner-Up - "Pet Sematary" by Terri Strong

    There were several Honorable Mentions as well. Each Honorable Mention got a Booth Library book-bag:

    "Miles and Miles of Reptiles" by Laura Mullin "House of Cards" by Kai Hung "Harry Potter" by Jeanne Goble and Johna Shackles Congratulations to the winners, and thank you to everyone who participated and/or attended and made the festival a fun event. I hope you were inspired to think about your entry for next year!
  • Good luck with finals

    Take a study break at the library Monday, May 2. Free popcorn and lemonade will be served at 7:00pm on the 3000 level bridge.
  • Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin Exhibit

    In tandem with the first Booth Library Edible Book Festival, this exhibit introduces the viewer to Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, the inspiration for the International Edible Book Festival. Brillat-Savarin (1755-1826) is most famous for his book Physiologie du goût, a witty meditation on food. Physiologie du gout has never been out of print since it was first published. Among Brillat-Savarin's bon mots are "Tell me what you eat and I will tell you what you are" (now used in the TV series 'Iron Chef'). Brillat-Savarin was also one of the first persons to identify high sugar content foods as contributors to obesity. Curated by Todd Bruns.
  • New Books List Updated

    Each month, a list is compiled of new titles added to Booth Library's collection. For detailed information on the 2,405 new print titles titles added in April please see the complete April New Titles list.
  • Booth Library Postcard Collection

    The Booth Library Postcard Collection includes over 4,000 postcards. The collection focus is on the rich history of Illinois communities, and it is especially rich in both interior and exterior views of buildings for schools, institutes, colleges, and universities.
  • Chemistry in Practice

    Eastern Illinois University will host, for the first time, the 21st meeting of the Midwest Organic Solid-State Chemistry Symposium (MOSSCS). Typically assembling at Big Ten Universities, this is the first time the symposium will be held at a primarily undergraduate institution. MOSSCS will be June 10-11, 2011. Stop into Booth Library to view a portion of our organic solid-state chemistry collection on display in the third floor main walkway and learn more about the MOSSCS event! Curated by Kirstin Duffin.
  • Discover New Horizons at Booth Library and Abroad

    In 2010-2011, 305 students participated in a study abroad program while at EIU, up from 97 participants in 2001-2002. Curious about what to expect from a study abroad experience? Take time to look at the newest exhibit in Booth Library's Marvin foyer featuring materials from the library's collection and the EIU Study Abroad Office. From learn-a-language audio programs and travel guides to maps and foreign study guidebooks, the library has a wealth of information about planning your study abroad experience. Curated by Kirstin Duffin.
  • Library Featured on Heartland Highways

    Booth Library is featured in two episodes of WEIU's Heartland Highways. The episodes feature the Booth Library Postcard Collection and the Teachers Tame the Prairie exhibit.



  • Summer Library Workshops

    Library Technology Services will teach workshops on Microsoft Excel 2007, Microsoft PowerPoint 2007, and Microsoft Outlook 2007. We are also offering Safe on teh INternet, which tesched you how to protect you privacy and identity on the Internet. To preview the list or to sign up online, see the workshop schedule for a full list of available workshops. Advance registration is required to participate.
  • New Books List Updated

    Each month, a list is compiled of new titles added to Booth Library's collection. For detailed information on the 1,413 new print titles titles added in May please see the complete May New Titles list.
  • Summer Library Workshops

    Library Technology Services will teach workshops on Microsoft Excel 2007, Microsoft PowerPoint 2007, and Microsoft Outlook 2007. We are also offering Safe on teh INternet, which tesched you how to protect you privacy and identity on the Internet. To preview the list or to sign up online, see the workshop schedule for a full list of available workshops. Advance registration is required to participate.
  • The Wonderful World of Daylilies

    An exhibit on daylilies is on display in the Marvin Foyer of Booth Library during the height of the daylily season in Charleston. The exhibit will feature pretty pictures of flowers, some historical and technical information, and freshly picked flowers from John Whisler's home garden. Flower enthusiasts may want to visit repeatedly as new daylilies come into bloom and are featured in the display.

  • New Books List Updated

    Each month, a list is compiled of new titles added to Booth Library's collection. For detailed information on the 1,672 new print titles titles added in June please see the complete June New Titles list.
  • What's Your Type

    This exhibit looks at the origins of selected typefaces, as well as historical and contemporary examples of their use in media, popular and corporate culture. "What's Your Type?" is on display in the Reference Hallway through the end of August. Curated by Ellen K. Corrigan.

    Read more about the exhibit in the Daily Eastern News article Exhibit to show history, evolution of typefaces.
  • Library website unavailable Tuesday, August 9

    Due to a scheduled electrical outage on Tuesday, August 9 the library website will become unavailable at 10:00 am and is expected return to service at noon. Off-campus access to library resources will also be unavailable during this period.

  • 2010-2011 Cultivating Creativity Children’s Art Exhibit

    The traveling exhibition Cultivating Creativity 2010-2011: Consolidated Communications Children's Art Exhibit travels to Charleston at Booth Library, 600 Lincoln Ave, Charleston. The exhibit will be on view August 15 through August 29. Cultivating Creativity showcases some of the outstanding art produced through east-central Illinois school art programs. Presented is art by 40 students, each representing a different school. The art was created during the 2009-2010 school year.

    Representing schools in the Charleston are Thomas Barger, Charleston High School, Ally Bower, Jefferson Elementary School, Bailey Day, Carl Sandburg Elementary School, Cole Limes, Charleston Middle School, Hannah Spencer, Ashmore Elementary School, and Connor Woodley, Mark Twain Elementary School.

    Barger's pencil drawing, "House of the Rising Sun" was created in the twelfth grade under the direction of Toni Satterfield. Bower created her ceramic piece, "Hippo" in the sixth grade, taught by Dorothy Bennett. Day's painting, "Arthur Dove-Style Landscape" was created in the first grade, taught by Heather Bryan. Limes' created his colored pencil drawing, "Recreation of Picasso's Weeping Woman" under the direction of Mandy White. Taught by Jillian Benoit, Spencer made her pastel drawing, "The Marvelous Cake" and Woodley created his painting, "Jasper Johns Flag."

    Cultivating Creativity 2010-2011is sponsored by Consolidated Communications and the Tarble Arts Center, Eastern Illinois University. The exhibit will travel to 14 area communities, from Assumption to Paris and from Tuscola to Effingham. The Tarble Arts Center teams with Consolidated Communications in this annual program to showcase some of the outstanding art by area students and to help raise awareness of the importance of including the arts as part of the regular school curriculum.

    Richard Riley, U.S. Secretary of the Department of Education, in the publication "Champions of Change: The Impact of the Arts on Learning", emphasizes the importance of the arts in a comprehensive education at an early age. "Through engagement with the arts, young people can better begin lifelong journeys of developing their capabilities and contributing to the world around them. The arts teach young people how to learn by giving them the first step: the desire to learn."

    Area schools participating this year include: Arcola District #306, Arthur District #305; Charleston District #1; Casey-Westfield Junior and Senior High Schools; Bond, Gregory and Central A&M Middle School, Assumption-Moweaqua; Central Grade School, Effingham; Charleston Middle School; Crestwood Elementary and Junior High School, Paris; Effingham Junior High and High Schools; Kansas District #3; Main Street and Moulton Schools, Shelbyville; Mattoon District #2; Oakland District #5; Okaw Valley District #302; South Side Elementary School, Effingham; St. Anthony Grade School, Effingham; Stewardson-Strasburg District #5A; St. Mary's School, Paris; Sullivan Middle and High Schools; Tuscola High School; and Windsor District #1.

    The exhibit is comprised of art works in a wide variety of media and styles. Included are paintings in tempera, acrylic, and watercolor; drawings in ink, pastel, colored pencil, crayon, chalk and graphite; and block prints and collage. Other media represented are fabric, clay, scratchboards, digital photography and mixed media.

    Cultivating Creativity is a community engagement program of the Tarble Arts Center. The Tarble also offers a variety of other educational programs for area schools, including a tour/workshop Enrichment program that is open to area fifth grade and to junior/senior high art students, a month-long artist-in-the-schools residency, guided tours, and teacher workshops. Most programs are presented free of charge to the participating schools and supported through Tarble membership contributions and the Tarble Arts Center Endowment/EIU Foundation.

    For more information about the Cultivating Creativity exhibit or other programs contact the Tarble Arts Center at 217/581-ARTS (-2787) or tarble@eiu.edu. The Tarble is funded in part by the Tarble Arts Center Fund/EIU Foundation, Tarble Arts membership contributions, and program sponsors. A division of the EIU College of Arts & Humanities, the Tarble is accredited by the American Association of Museums.

  • General Library Tours

    Booth Library is offering library orientation tours between August 22 and September 28. The Library is closed on September 5, so there will be no tour that day. Tours meet in the library's North Foyer at the following times:

    Mondays 6:00 p.m.
    Tuesdays 11:00 a.m.
    Wednesdays 5:00 p.m.

    Sessions last approximately 45 minutes. All are welcome to attend. To take a tour, simply go to the Marvin Foyer (inside the north entrance) in Booth Library at the scheduled time. Registration is not required for general tours.
  • Open House

    On Tuesday, August 30th from 3:00 - 5:00, Booth Library will be hosting an open house. Everyone is welcome for tours, games, prizes and refreshments. This will be a great opportunity to discover all that the library has to offer and how the staff can help make your assignments and papers easier. We look forward to seeing you at the library.
  • Ballenger Teachers Center Fall 2011 Storytimes

    The Ballenger Teachers Center in Booth Library would like to welcome children ages 3-7 accompanied by an adult to Saturday Morning Storytime. This free weekend program encourages children to broaden their creativity with timeless stories and fun craft projects. For more information, call 217-581-8442. Storytimes this fall will take place at 10 a.m. on September 24, October 1, 8, and 29, and November 5 and 12.
  • New Books List Updated

    Each month, a list is compiled of new titles added to Booth Library's collection. For detailed information on the 1,372 new print titles titles added in June please see the complete August New Titles list.
  • Fall Book Sale

    Booth Library will host a Fall Book Sale, to be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. outside the north entrance of the library on Tuesday, Sept. 20. Rain date will be the following day, if necessary. This sale is in addition to the annual book sale held during National Library Week in April.

    A large selection of books in all subject areas, as well as paperback fiction titles, will be available. The library requests that there be no advance sales. The proceeds from the sale are used to enhance library programs and services.
  • Ballenger Teachers Center Storytime Fall 2011

    The Ballenger Teachers Center in Booth Library would like to welcome children ages 3-7 accompanied by an adult to Saturday Morning Storytime. This free weekend program encourages children to broaden their creativity with timeless stories and fun craft projects. For more information, call 217-581-8442. Storytimes remaining this fall are 10 a.m. October 1,8, and 29 and November 5 and 12.
  • Ballenger Teachers Center Storytime Fall 2011

    The Ballenger Teachers Center in Booth Library would like to welcome children ages 3-7 accompanied by an adult to Saturday Morning Storytime. This free weekend program encourages children to broaden their creativity with timeless stories and fun craft projects. For more information, call 217-581-8442. Storytimes remaining for this fall are at 10 a.m. on October 8 and 29 and November 5 and 12.
  • Try It! Illinois

    Illinois State Library's annual statewide database trial, October 1 through November 30. Try-It! Illinois is open to all Illinois library staffs and Illinois library users. You must have a valid panther card to access Try It! Illinois from EIU. Please see the instructions for more information on accessing the trial.
  • Remembering America's Civil War: A 150 Year Retrospective

    Exhibits are on display throughout the library commemorating the United States Civil War, 150 years after it began. For detailed information, see the exhibit web page.
  • Quiet Study Area

    Looking for a quiet place to study? The second floor of Booth Library is a designated quiet study area. Study tables, computers, and internet and power connections for laptops are available in the quiet study area.
  • A Futuristic Look Through Ancient Lenses

    Scholarly presentations on the technologies, religion, and history of ancient Egypt. October 6 - November 2, 2011. For detailed event information, see the event web page.
  • Ballenger Teachers Center Storytime Fall 2011

    The Ballenger Teachers Center in Booth Library would like to welcome children ages 3-7 accompanied by an adult to Saturday Morning Storytime. This free weekend program encourages children to broaden their creativity with timeless stories and fun craft projects. For more information, call 217-581-8442. Storytimes remaining are at 10 a.m. on October 29, November 5, and November 12.
  • Ballenger Teachers Center Storytime Fall 2011

    The Ballenger Teachers Center in Booth Library would like to welcome children ages 3-7 accompanied by an adult to Saturday Morning Storytime. This free weekend program encourages children to broaden their creativity with timeless stories and fun craft projects. For more information, call 217-581-8442. Storytimes remaining this fall are 10 a.m. on November 5th and 12th.
  • Women Writers of the Romantic Era

    Conventional discussions of the British Romantic Era (1780-1830) generally focus on the "Big Six" male writers - Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Percy Shelley, Keats and Blake. The contributions of women writers have almost been forgotten even though many women writers were well known and well read in their day. The exhibit in the South Lobby features six women Romantic Era Writers. Curated by Janice Derr and Karen Whisler.
  • Ballenger Teachers Center Storytime Fall 2011

    The Ballenger Teachers Center in Booth Library would like to welcome children ages 3-7 accompanied by an adult to Saturday Morning Storytime. This free weekend program encourages children to broaden their creativity with timeless stories and fun craft projects. For more information, call 217-581-8442. The last storytime of fall semester will be held at 10 a.m. on November 12th.
  • Library without power Tuesday, Nov. 22

    There will be a planned electrical outage on Tuesday, November 22, 2011 from 7:00am to noon. There will be no electrical power, and network connectivity will likely be limited at Booth Library. The library website may be unavailable for portions of the outage. Off-campus access to library resources may also be unavailable during this period.

    The library will remain open and it will be possible to check out and return materials.
  • Good luck with finals

    Take a study break at the library Monday, December 12. Free popcorn and lemonade will be served at 7:00pm on the 3000 level bridge.
  • New Books List Updated

    Each month, a list is compiled of new titles added to Booth Library's collection. For detailed information on the 1,780 new print titles titles added in November please see the complete November New Titles list.
  • 2012 Awards for Excellence in Student Research and Creativity

    Booth Library at Eastern Illinois University announces its awards program to promote and recognize excellence in student research. The awards program encourages students to utilize the wealth of information available at Booth Library to enhance their studies. These awards are not intended to duplicate or replace any other standing campus awards. Each entry will become a part of Booth Library Student Research and Creativity Collection.

    An application form and entry guidelines are available at http://www.library.eiu.edu/awardsforexcellence

  • Booth Library Holiday Hours for December 2011, January 2012

    Booth Library will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Dec. 20, 21, 27 and 28. The library will be closed Dec. 22-26 and Dec. 29 through Jan. 2; however, faculty may call the dean’s office at 581-6061 for admission to use the collection on Dec. 22 and 29. During the first week of January, the library will be open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The library will resume regular semester hours on Sunday, Jan. 8.
  • Quiet Study Area

    Looking for a quiet place to study? The second floor of Booth Library is a designated quiet study area. Study tables, computers, and internet and power connections for laptops are available in the quiet study area.