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2013 News

  • 868 New Titles added in December

    During the month of December, Booth Library acquired and cataloged 868 new titles. The list can be viewed at http://www.library.eiu.edu/newtitles. The list is arranged by location: Ballenger Teachers' Center, Books, Electronic Resources, Illinois and Federal Documents, Maps, Media, Reference Collection, Special Collections and University Archives. The titles are listed by call number within each location. Please contact Karen Whisler, head of Collection Development, at 581-7551 or klwhisler@eiu.edu if you have any questions.
  • Exhibit focuses on America's music

    Visitors can learn about many different aspects of America's music during a special exhibit now on display at Booth Library.

    The exhibit is being held in conjunction with a program series, America's Music: A Film History of Our Popular Music from Blues to Bluegrass to Broadway, being held on the EIU campus through April 6.

    The America's Music exhibit focuses on several genres of music, including country, bluegrass, folk, soul, disco, hip hop, Broadway, blues, gospel, jazz and rock 'n' roll, as well as looking at topics such as the business of music, music technology and more.

    The exhibit features The Donald and Suellyn Garner Illinois Sheet Music Collection, which contains the work of Illinois artists who wrote music and lyrics, participated in publication or designed cover art. These materials are now a part of Booth Library's Special Collections. The Garners are longtime residents of Charleston.

    The exhibit includes albums, musical instruments, historical information, sheet music and biographical souvenirs, in addition to a Meme Generator, at which visitors are invited to create their own title or caption for historic sheet music and photos. For exhibit descriptions and online access to the Meme Generator, visit http://www.library.eiu.edu/exhibits/americasmusic/.

    Curators for the exhibit are graduate students in history Philip Mohr and Patrick Vonesh, assisted by Amy Gilkey, undergraduate student of English, and Luis Alarcon, graduate student of English.

  • Tax Forms

    Copies of all major federal and Illinois state tax forms and booklets are available in the Reference Area of the library. Additional specialized forms are available for photocopying. Online tax forms are also available.
  • ‘America’s Music’ program at Marshall library postponed until Feb. 28

    The America's Music program focusing on bluegrass music scheduled for Feb. 21 at the Marshall Public Library has been postponed due to expected poor weather conditions. The program now will be presented at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 28, at the Marshall Public Library, 612 Archer Ave.

    Patricia Poulter, associate dean of the College of Arts and Humanities and a professor of music at EIU, will introduce and lead discussion about the film High Lonesome: The Story of Bluegrass Music. The evening also will include a short musical performance of bluegrass music.

    The public is invited and admission is free.

  • 1,424 New Items Added to Booth Library Collections

    During the month of February, Booth Library acquired and cataloged 1,424 new titles. The list can be viewed at http://www.library.eiu.edu/newtitles. The list is arranged by location: Ballenger Teachers' Center, Books, Electronic Resources, Illinois and Federal Documents, Maps, Media, Reference Collection, Special Collections and University Archives. The titles are listed by call number within each location. Please contact Karen Whisler, head of Collection Development, at 581-7551 or klwhisler@eiu.edu if you have any questions.
  • 1169 New Titles added in January

    During the month of January, Booth Library acquired and cataloged 1,169 new titles. The list can be viewed at http://www.library.eiu.edu/newtitles. The list is arranged by location: Ballenger Teachers' Center, Books, Electronic Resources, Illinois and Federal Documents, Maps, Media, Reference Collection, Special Collections and University Archives. The titles are listed by call number within each location. Please contact Karen Whisler, head of Collection Development, at 581-7551 or klwhisler@eiu.edu if you have any questions.
  • Saturday story times offered for children

    Children ages 3 to 7 are invited to attend story time from 10 to 11 a.m. April 6 and 13 at Booth Library's Ballenger Teachers Center.

    Programs will feature stories, crafts and activities. All children must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

    For more information call 581-8442.

  • Periodical Review List

    The lists of periodical and standing order subscriptions selected for cancellation have been compiled for campus review. The Periodical and Standing Order Review is an annual exercise designed to ensure that library collections continue to meet the needs of library users. Questions about the review can be addressed to the Reference Desk (581-6072) or individual subject librarians. Booth Library added a number of new periodical subscriptions in 2013. The list of these titles is now included on the Periodical Review page (see link above).
  • Booth Library's Edible Book Festival

    The Edible Book Festival will be held on Monday, April 15 at 5pm and all are invited to attend. An "edible book" is something that looks like a book or is book-themed and is made out of food. If you would like to participate, you can fill out this online application: http://www.library.eiu.edu/exhibits/edible-book/application.html. Prizes will be awarded to the best entries in the show.
  • Fallen Heroes Memorial Wall to be on display

    Illinois service men and women who have died as a result of their military service will be honored on April 4-5. The Illinois Patriot Guard Fallen Heroes Traveling Memorial Wall will be on display from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day at Booth Library.

    The wall features 305 Illinois residents who died during or as a result of Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operating Enduring Freedom and Operation New Dawn. On the wall are the names, portraits, hometown, rank and date of death of these military heroes.

    Members of the public are encouraged to visit the wall. There is no charge; donations will be accepted. Visitors may enter either the north or south doors of the library, which is located just east of Fourth Street between Grant and Roosevelt avenues, about one block east of Lantz Arena.

    Metered parking on the EIU campus can be found in the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union lot. On April 5, the public also may park in any green or blue student lot. For a parking map of campus, visit http://www.eiu.edu/police/parking.pdf.

    The Fallen Heroes Traveling Memorial Wall is the result of a volunteer project by Illinois Gold Star military families and members of the Illinois Patriot Guard Riders. A Patriot Guard flag presentation is planned at 9 a.m. April 4 outside Booth Library.

    The original idea for the memorial wall came in the fall of 2010 from a Gold Star grandfather, who wanted to honor not only his grandson, but all Illinois fallen heroes. After a Wall of Honor was created for an event in Knoxville, it was decided to take the memorial wall on the road so that it can be seen by as many people as possible, according to a Patriot Guard brochure.

    "We started touring the wall in February 2011," said Don Pannier, whose son, Philip, died in January 2008. "We set up the wall 60 times that year and had 30,000 miles of travel. In 2012, we traveled 72 times for 40,000 miles of travel."

    Pannier said at each stop a member of a Gold Star Family is on hand to answer questions about the wall and help family members find their loved one's information.

    The only requirement to be on the wall is that the soldier served one tour overseas and died as a result of that service, Pannier said. Families must request that the information be added to the wall.

    The now-32-foot wall has grown in size since its inception, from 240 military heroes featured initially to 305 today.

    "We're strictly running on free-will donations," Pannier said. "We sell shirts, caps and a few other things, and we also have a free-will donation jar on our table."

    The memorial wall is one of several veterans activities planned on April 4-5 at EIU as part of Project: Hero. Self-defense classes will be offered in the Lantz Gymnasium Aerobics Room at 10 a.m. and noon on April 4, followed by Water Wars at 1 p.m. on the Library Quad (north of Booth Library). On April 5, the Mobile Vet Center will be located south of the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union throughout the day. A veterans service fair, Rucksacks to Backpacks, will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the University Ballroom, with a veterans luncheon at 11:30 a.m. and an ice cream social beginning at 3 p.m.

    For more information about the traveling memorial wall or other veteran events at EIU, contact Stephen Knotts, EIU veterans services coordinator, at 581-7888 or veterans@eiu.edu. More information about the memorial wall can be found at www.ilpgmemorialwall.com.

  • Picture Your Library!

    In recognition of National Library Week, Booth Library asks the campus community to "Picture Your Library!"

    All students, staff, faculty and community members are encouraged to take a photo of themselves and/or their friends in their favorite locations at Booth Library. Whether you are lounging in the atrium, using the puppets in the Ballenger Teachers Center, napping in the fourth-floor lounge, using computers in the "fish bowl" or working in one of the group study rooms, we want to see it!

    To submit a photo(s), email it to library@eiu.edu or upload it to the Booth Library Facebook page, www.facebook.com/BoothLibrary. Photos may be submitted through April 12.

    These photos will be compiled into a photo gallery that will be displayed on the library website. The photo gallery will be available for viewing beginning April 15. National Library Week is April 14-20.

    All submitted photos may be used to promote Booth Library and its activities. For more information about Picture Your Library, call 581-6061.

  • NoteBooth newsletter now available

    The current issue of NoteBooth, the newsletter of Booth Library, is available at www.library.eiu.edu/notebooth. Remember to visit us for our upcoming National Library Week events! In an effort to conserve resources, NoteBooth is no longer distributed in print.
  • 1,523 New Items Added to Booth Library Collections

    During the month of March, Booth Library acquired and cataloged 1,523 new titles. The list can be viewed at http://www.library.eiu.edu/newtitles. The list is arranged by location: Ballenger Teachers' Center, Books, Electronic Resources, Illinois and Federal Documents, Maps, Media, Reference Collection, Special Collections and University Archives. The titles are listed by call number within each location. Please contact Karen Whisler, head of Collection Development, at 581-7551 or klwhisler@eiu.edu if you have any questions.
  • National Library Week April 14-20

    Booth Library will celebrate National Library Week April 14-20 and will host several events.

    On April 15, the library hosted the third annual Edible Book Festival. An "edible book" is something that looks like a book or is book-themed and is made out of food.

    There were 33 entries and approximately 100 attendees. Congratulations to the award winners:

    Dean's Choice Gold Medal - "Miss Havisham's Wedding Cake" by Ellen Corrigan

    Dean's Choice Silver Medal - "Mrs. Dilloway" by Bob Hillman and Marlene Slough

    People's Choice Gold Medal - "A Dog's Life" by Ann Brownson

    People's Choice Silver Medal - "Jack and the Beans Talk" by Jana Aydt

    Best Children's Book Theme - "Owl Babies" by Michele McDaniel

    Best Student Entry - "Old Man and the Seaweed" by Cliff Harrison

    Best Family Entry - "Chicks Ahoy!" by Mark and Sarah Johnson

    Honorable Mention - "Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" by Kai Hung

    Honorable Mention - "Diary of Samuel Peeps" by Peter and Holly Andrews

    Honorable Mention - "Bunnicula" by Stacey Knight-Davis

    To see photos of all of the entries, click here https://www.facebook.com/alex.heldebrandt#!/media/set/?set=a.10151570409368586.1073741826.5904843585&type=1.

    On April 25 (RESCHEDULED!), the annual book sale will be held outside the south entrance of Booth Library in the Alumni Quad from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The sale was postponed from April 17 due to rainy weather conditions. The library requests no sales in advance. A large selection of books in all subject areas and hundreds of paperback fiction titles will be available for sale. All items have been donated by the campus and local communities. The proceeds from the sale are used to enhance library programs and services.

    At 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 17, the winners of the 2013 Awards for Excellence in Student Research and Creativity will be announced during a reception hosted by the Library Advisory Board. Everyone is welcome to attend. The awards program promotes and recognizes excellence in student research and encourages students to utilize the wealth of information available at Booth Library to enhance their studies.

    In addition, library patrons shared photos for the Picture Your Library! program. To view the photo gallery, click here http://http://www.library.eiu.edu/nlw/2013/.

  • Student research award winners announced

    The Library Advisory Board of Booth Library proudly announces the 2013 Awards for Excellence in Student Research and Creativity.

    The graduate student award recipient is Luke Eastin of Mattoon for Home Rule and Environmentalism: The Adoption of Green Initiatives in U.S. Municipalities. Elizabeth Scribner of Tuscola received an honorable mention for Exploring Different Factors of Language Development.

    Undergraduate student award recipients are: Amanda Long of Hettick for Involve Me: Using the Orff Approach within the Elementary Classroom, Ryan Repking of Teutopolis for The Political and Personal Tension between Tom Bradley and Daryl Gates, and Danielle Rogner of Barrington for Cherokee Acculturation and the Fall of Women's Status.

    The student award recipients will be honored at a reception to be held at 4:30 p.m. April 17 in the Booth Library 4440 - Witters Conference Room. The students will speak briefly about their entries and receive recognition for their achievements. Everyone is invited to attend.

    The Booth Library Awards for Excellence in Student Research and Creativity program promotes and recognizes excellence in student research. The program encourages students to enhance their studies by utilizing the wealth of information available at Booth Library and other research venues.

    All entries were original works completed by Eastern students within the last 12 months. The award recipients were selected on the basis of excellence, creativity and the use of research resources.

  • Book sale postponed

    Booth Library will hold its annual book sale from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 25 outside the SOUTH entrance of the library in the Alumni Quad.

    The sale was originally scheduled for April 17 and then April 24 but was postponed due to expected rainy weather conditions.

    A large selection of books in all subject areas and hundreds of paperback fiction titles will be available for sale. Stop by and see us!

  • Extended hours offered April 27

    Booth Library announces extended hours on April 27 in preparation of finals week. The library will be open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. that day. Booth Library's regular spring hours will continue through May 4. They are 8 a.m. to 1 a.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 1 a.m. Sunday.
  • Good luck with finals!

    Take a study break at the library Monday, April 29. Free popcorn and lemonade will be served at 7:00pm on the 3000 (main) level bridge.
  • 1,800 New Items Added to Booth Library Collections

    During the month of April, Booth Library acquired and cataloged 1,800 new titles. The list can be viewed at http://www.library.eiu.edu/newtitles. The list is arranged by location: Ballenger Teachers' Center, Books, Electronic Resources, Illinois and Federal Documents, Maps, Media, Reference Collection, Special Collections and University Archives. The titles are listed by call number within each location. Please contact Karen Whisler, head of Collection Development, at 581-7551 or klwhisler@eiu.edu if you have any questions.
  • Library awarded grant to present 'Muslim Journeys'

    Booth Library has received a $4,500 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association to host a five-part reading and discussion series titled "Let's Talk About It: Muslim Journeys."

    Booth Library is one of 125 libraries and state humanities councils across the country selected to participate in the project, which seeks to familiarize the public with the people, places, history, faith and cultures of Muslims in the United States and around the world.

    "We are delighted to have been chosen to host this unique series that will allow citizens of East Central Illinois a chance to explore and discuss some important themes in Muslim history and literature with the help of well-qualified scholars," said Allen Lanham, dean of library services.

    The EIU project scholars are Brian Mann, assistant professor of history, and Jay Shinde, assistant professor of business. Mann has a master of arts degree in history from the University of Texas at Austin and will receive a Ph.D. in history from UT-Austin in August. His research interests include the modern Middle East, with special focus on modern Iran. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on the Middle East and Islamic world.

    Shinde is a practicing Sufi and has a Ph.D. in business administration (accounting) from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. He teaches Sufi meditation to EIU students and the community and is a board member of the Qadriya Sufi Foundation of America.

    Through the "Let's Talk About It" grant, the library will host a five-part book discussion moderated by these project scholars and Booth Library staff. A limited number of free books will be available for participants in the book series. Titles are The Children of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, by F.E. Peters, discussion led by Mann; Muhammad: A Very Short Introduction, by Jonathan A.C. Brown, led by Mann; The Story of the Qur'an: Its History and Place in Muslim Life, by Ingrid Mattson, led by Mann; The Art of Hajj, by Venetia Porter, led by Mann; and Rumi: Poet and Mystic, edited and translated by Reynold A. Nicholson, led by Shinde.

    Booth Library's programs will focus on the theme "Pathways of Faith." Following the correct pathway to spiritual fulfillment and success is a key Islamic principle.

    All of the books to be discussed in this series are part of the "Bridging Culture" Bookshelf: Muslim Journeys. The books and films comprising the Bookshelf were selected with the advice of librarians and cultural programming experts, as well as distinguished scholars in the fields of anthropology, world history, religious studies, interfaith dialogue, the history of art and architecture, world literature, Middle East studies, Southeast Asian studies, African studies and Islamic studies.

    In association with the grant, Booth Library will sponsor a semester-long programming series on Muslim culture during the spring semester of 2014. Among the activities planned are a three-part film series with discussion led by EIU faculty members and librarians, and an interfaith panel to explore both Western and Eastern faiths.

    All events will be free and open to the public. More information on these events will be available on the Booth Library website, www.library.eiu.edu; on the library Facebook or Twitter pages; or by calling Kirstin Duffin, reference librarian, at 581-7550.

    The "Bridging Cultures" Bookshelf: Muslim Journeys is a project of NEH, conducted in cooperation with the ALA Public Programs Office, with support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Additional support for the arts and media components was provided by the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Arts. Local support is provided by EIU's Academy of Lifetime Learning and the Interdisciplinary Center for Global Diversity.

  • 815 New Items Added to Booth Library Collections

    During the month of May, Booth Library acquired and cataloged 815 new titles. The list can be viewed at http://www.library.eiu.edu/newtitles. The list is arranged by location: Ballenger Teachers' Center, Books, Electronic Resources, Illinois and Federal Documents, Maps, Media, Reference Collection, Special Collections and University Archives. The titles are listed by call number within each location. Please contact Karen Whisler, head of Collection Development, at 581-7551 or klwhisler@eiu.edu if you have any questions.
  • Exhibit focuses on Jan Spivey Gilchrist

    A new exhibit at Booth Library focuses on the works of award-winning writer and book illustrator Jan Spivey Gilchrist. Gilchrist, an alumna of Eastern Illinois University, was recently appointed to serve on the EIU Board of Trustees.

    The exhibit, on display in the third-floor reference hallway, presents some of the many books and illustrations composed by Gilchrist. She has won numerous awards and commissions, including the Coretta Scott King Award. She has illustrated many of Eloise Greenfield's books and has written and illustrated picture books, including "Obama: The Day the World Danced."

    Gilchrist has exhibited extensively throughout the United States, Canada, Europe and the Caribbean. Her works have appeared on national television, and her illustrations have been featured or reviewed in many national newspapers and magazines.

    Gilchrist earned a bachelor's degree in art education at EIU in 1973 and was named a Distinguished Alumna in 1992. She was inducted into the International Hall of Fame for Writers of African Descent and the Society of Illustrators. She and her husband, Kelvin Gilchrist, live in Olympia Fields and have two children.

    The Booth Library exhibit was curated by Jeanne Goble, senior library specialist.

  • Summer exhibits focus on science fiction, travel

    The Marvin Foyer on the north end of Booth Library is home to four new exhibits this summer.

    The north side of the foyer takes a look at "Get Your Kicks on Route 66" and "Celebrating the National Park Services." The exhibit includes a large map of Route 66, which stretches from Chicago to Los Angeles, and examines the 97-year history of the National Park Service, with a look at national parks such as Yellowstone, Olympic and the Great Smoky Mountains.

    The south side of the foyer hosts exhibits about "Jules Verne: Father of Science Fiction" and "Steampunk World." Verne is a French novelist, poet and playwright best known for his adventure novels and for the genre of science fiction. Steampunk is a sub-genre of science fiction that typically features steam-powered machinery.

    These Booth Library exhibits were curated by Booth Library support staff members Jeanne Goble, Joseph Hall-Ingram, Michele McDaniel and Sally van der Graaff.

  • Library catalog down for maintenance

    For help with finding materials, please ask at the reference desk, or call us at 581-6072.

    A message from CARLI,the Consortium of Academic Libraries in Illinois: Starting at 5PM on Friday, June 21st, we will power down our Production Voyager servers and migrate the Oracle databases from their current Solaris server to a new Linux server. All Voyager services (including VuFind and Classic WebVoyage OPACs) will be offline during this event. We plan to have everything up and running again Sunday night (June 23rd).
  • 730 New Items Added to Booth Library Collections

    During the month of June, Booth Library acquired and cataloged 730 new titles. The list can be viewed at http://www.library.eiu.edu/newtitles. The list is arranged by location: Ballenger Teachers' Center, Books, Electronic Resources, Illinois and Federal Documents, Maps, Media, Reference Collection, Special Collections and University Archives. The titles are listed by call number within each location. Please contact Karen Whisler, head of Collection Development, at 581-7551 or klwhisler@eiu.edu if you have any questions.
  • Library professor discovers history through the pages of a novel

    Sarah Johnson

    For some, learning about the past comes naturally through the pages of a good book.

    That's how Booth Library reference librarian Sarah Johnson first became a fan of historical fiction.

    "I've been reading it since I was a teen," she said. "I started out reading historical fantasy novels, such as stories about King Arthur's court. Then I got more interested in the historical part of it."

    Today, Johnson shares her love of historical fiction as a book reviewer and through her blog, Reading the Past.

    Johnson, professor of library services at Eastern Illinois University, describes historical fiction most simply as "fiction set in the past." The book must be set at least 50 years before the author's time. The story is based on research and not on the author's personal experiences. "So, books by authors like Jane Austen wouldn't count," she said.

    She has been writing Reading the Past for more than seven years. Although she had been reviewing books for some time, Johnson said she started the blog because "there wasn't a place to have important conversations and to talk to others with common interests."

    Reading the Past (www.readingthepast.com) now gets about 7,500 page views and 5,000 visits per month. "My audience is steadily growing," she said.

    The blog contains book reviews, author interviews and more. Occasionally she will accept guest blogs written by others. Oftentimes these are written by authors of historical fiction who discuss their research process.

    However, Johnson most enjoys communicating with other fans of historical fiction. "A lot of people visit the blog but don't comment. Others comment regularly. When they do, I try to always respond."

    In addition to the blog, Johnson has written dozens of historical fiction book reviews for Booklist and other publications. She gets many requests to review books, usually from authors or their publicists, but she has stopped accepting submissions for now. "I'm still trying to catch up."

    Johnson said she reads about eight books per month. She reviews most of them and posts some on her blog, too. She keeps track of all the books she has read on the Goodreads website. She also communicates with other historical fiction fans through her blog's Facebook page, which she updates regularly, and through Twitter, where she has a growing audience of almost 2,500 followers.

    And just as she uses social media as a way to communicate with fans of historical novels, she also uses modern technology to read them.

    "I used to read books exclusively in hard copy," she said. "In the last couple of months I've been reading more and more ebooks, or online versions of books."

    In addition to reading, reviewing and blogging about novels, Johnson edits others' reviews for the Historical Novels Review. She started as an editor there in 2000 after reading that the British publication was seeking editors in America. "I didn't really know what I was getting into," she said.

    As an editor, she requests books from publishers and assigns them to various reviewers. She also edits the completed reviews before they appear in the quarterly journal, which publishes about 300 reviews in each edition.

    In order to help organize the many titles of historical fiction, Johnson has written two reference works, Historical Fiction: A Guide to the Genre, which covers novels published between 1995 and 2004, and its companion, Historical Fiction II, which lists titles published between 2004 and 2008. Both are published by Libraries Unlimited of Westport, Conn.

    "Most reference materials sort titles by time periods," she said. "I organized mine by subgenre, since that's how most people try to find books." For example, titles are listed in a subgenre such as historical thrillers, and then by sub-categories, such as literary, spy or intrigue.

    The reference books are designed to help librarians guide their patrons to specific novels. If a library patron enjoys a particular historical novel, for example, a librarian can help him find more books like it by looking in the reference book by author, subject, place and time. In addition to her two reference works and many book reviews, Johnson has written numerous essays and book chapters about the historical fiction genre.

    Johnson has been a librarian for 18 years and has worked at Booth Library since 2002. As a professor, she works as a reference and electronic resources librarian. She was honored for her work in historical fiction last year when she received the American Library Association's Louis Shores Award for excellence in book reviewing, among other honors.

    The genre of historical fiction is a broad one, and Johnson admits her tastes are wide-ranging, although some of her favorite subgenres are early American settings, Medieval England and Europe, historical mysteries, and novels with strong female characters.

    In the past she became a fan of Jean Plaidy, who has written a series of books about royalty. Today she enjoys works by Sharon Kay Penman, set in medieval times; and Kate Morton, who writes family sagas in the Gothic style, blending mystery and romance, set in the World War I and World War II era.

    "These days I go for things that are more unusual," she said. "After a while you move on to something else and discover something new."

    Johnson, a native of central Connecticut, and her husband, Mark, reside in rural Charleston. For more information about Johnson and the genre of historical fiction, visit her blog, www.readingthepast.com.

  • Cultivating Creativity

    The traveling exhibition Cultivating Creativity 2012-2013: Consolidated Communications Children's Art Exhibit will end its yearlong tour at Booth Library on the EIU campus, Charleston.

    The exhibit will be on view Aug. 6-25. Cultivating Creativity showcases some of the outstanding art produced through east-central Illinois school art programs. Presented is art by 43 students, each representing a different school. The art was created during the 2011-2012 school year.

    Representing schools in the Charleston area are Correye Johnson, Lake Crest Elementary School; Isabel Magee, Oakland High School; Jasper Jones, Carl Sandburg Elementary School; Greta Larson, Mark Twain Elementary School; Madelyn Pooley, Jefferson Elementary School; Todd Shaffer, Charleston Middle School; and Deece Schwartz, Ashmore Elementary School.

    Johnson's textile piece, The Pretty Flowers, was created in the second grade at Lake Crest Elementary School, under the instruction of Jill Sweeney. Tenth-grader Magee at Oakland High School also worked under teacher Jill Sweeney when she created her watercolor pencil drawing, Red Wolf.

    Under the instruction of Heather Bryan, Jones created his torn and cut paper piece Matisse Inspired Icarus at Carl Sandurg Elementary School. Larson's watercolor and crayon piece Bouquet for Mom, was created in kindergarten at Mark Twain Elementary School under the instruction of Penny Hess. Fifth-grader Pooley at Jefferson Elementary School was under the direction of Mandy White when she created her watercolor and crayon piece, Sea of Color.

    Under the instruction of Toni Satterfield, Shaffer created his pencil drawing My Bedroom Drawn at Charleston Middle School in the seventh grade. Schwartz's watercolor and pencil piece, Trees and Winter, was created in the third grade at Ashmore Elementary School, under the instruction of Penny Hess.

    Cultivating Creativity 2012-2013 is sponsored by Consolidated Communications and the Tarble Arts Center, EIU. The exhibit traveled to 14 area communities, from Assumption to Paris and from Tuscola to Effingham. The Tarble Arts Center teams with Consolidated Communications in this annual program to showcase some of the outstanding art by area students and to help raise awareness of the importance of including the arts as part of the regular school curriculum.

    Area districts and schools participating this year are: Altamont C.U. District 10; Arcola Elementary and High Schools; Arthur Elementary; Casey-Westfield Junior High and High Schools; Central A&M C.U. District 21, Assumption-Moweaqua; Central Grade School, Effingham; Charleston C.U. District 1; Crestwood C.U. District 4, Paris; Effingham Junior High and High Schools; Kansas Community School; Oakland C.U. District 5; Mattoon C.U. District 2; Neoga Middle and Junior-Senior High Schools; Okaw Valley Elementary, Middle, and High Schools, Bethany-Findlay; South Side School, Effingham; St. Anthony Grade and High Schools, Effingham; St. John's Lutheran School, Mattoon; St. Mary's School, Paris; Sullivan High School; Tuscola High School; and Windsor Elementary and Junior-Senior High Schools.

    The exhibit is comprised of art works in a wide variety of media and styles. Included are drawings in ink, colored pencil, crayon, and charcoal. Papier-mâché, textiles, photography, computer graphics and mixed media also are represented.

    Cultivating Creativity is a community engagement program of the Tarble Arts Center. The Tarble also offers a variety of other educational programs for area schools, including a tour/workshop Enrichment program that is open to area fifth grade and to junior/senior high art students, a monthlong artist-in-the-schools residency, guided tours, and teacher workshops. Most programs are presented free to the participating schools and supported through Tarble membership contributions and the Tarble Arts Center Endowment/EIU Foundation.

    For more information about the Cultivating Creativity exhibit or other programs contact the Tarble Arts Center at 217/581-ARTS (-2787) or tarble@eiu.edu.

  • The Keep

    Booth Library Assistant Professor Todd Bruns demonstrates the home page of The Keep, the institutional repository of Eastern Illinois University. The database contains nearly 30,000 documents and is searchable online at thekeep.eiu.edu

    A photo of Joan Allen appearing in a 1974 EIU theater production of One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest. A 1904 senior scrapbook from Eastern Illinois State Normal School. A Nutrition Jeopardy game designed by EIU faculty.

    With a few computer keystrokes, these and thousands of other materials can be accessed in The Keep.

    The Keep, administered by Booth Library, is the institutional repository for Eastern Illinois University. The electronic, open-access database is accessible through the library's web site.

    Since it launched in early 2012, nearly 30,000 documents have been added to the database, and those materials have been downloaded more than 100,000 times. The Keep is the second largest academic repository in Illinois and among the largest in the Midwest. And it's growing every day.

    The Keep is different than other library databases because it focuses on materials generated on campus or of local interest.

    Allen Lanham, dean of library services, said: "The Keep is an integral part of providing worldwide access to locally produced information and research, especially by Eastern faculty but also for worthy projects throughout our region. We want to promote the best work of east central Illinois."

    "We try to include what we think will have an impact historically," said Todd Bruns, institutional repository librarian at Booth Library. This includes information and images from EIU exhibits, conferences, video lectures, podcasts, posters, brochures, newsletters and press releases, as well as hundreds of photos and documents from University Archives.

    Many EIU faculty and students contribute their research, papers and masters theses by creating a "Selected Works" page in The Keep. Bruns continues to recruit more faculty members to post their documents this fall.

    "It's a really good tool, and it's a way for faculty to promote their work," Bruns said. In fact, for several months the most downloaded item in the database was a locally written master's thesis about wind turbines, he said. People doing research on a particular subject often are directed to The Keep after they conduct a search on a web browser such as Google.

    "The Keep helps me to make connections with a global audience," said Betsy Pudliner, assistant professor of hospitality management at EIU. "Because of the ability to upload work and create a place to enhance my own online digital portfolio, I have been able to reach a far greater field of audience than just here in the United States."

    In addition to individual faculty research, special collections in The Keep include Warbler yearbooks, past library exhibits and a plant inventory from Wesley Whiteside's Botanical Garden, among many others. One popular collection highlights materials from the EIU theatre arts department.

    Programs and photos for productions performed by EIU theatre from 1940 to today have been scanned into The Keep. "Although primarily from the files of the theatre arts department, these documents were found everywhere - on people's laptops, file drawers and desks," Bruns said. "We've put them all in one spot, and it's searchable. The theatre arts department is ecstatic."

    Future collections will include photographs and programs from the 56-year history of the Little Theatre on the Square in Sullivan and editions from the 98-year history of the Daily Eastern News student newspaper.

    The Journal of Collective Bargaining, a national publication of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions, also is housed in The Keep. The publication's editor is EIU Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs Jeff Cross.

    The journal's access numbers "exploded" once it was added to the EIU repository, Bruns said.

    While Bruns oversees the development of The Keep, many library staff members help with gathering materials, conducting research, and providing computer and programming help. In addition, student assistants spend dozens of hours per week scanning materials for addition to the database.

    "One of the college deans said we're essentially building a second library here - an all-electronic library," Bruns said. "Like any library, it takes a lot of resources. This is paying off."

    The Keep has received download requests from all 50 states and 135 countries around the world, from Fiji to the United Kingdom.

    "EIU's name is getting out there in a different way," Bruns said. "We've extended the university's reach immensely."

    For more information about The Keep, email thekeep@eiu.edu, call Bruns at 581-8381 or access the repository.

  • 839 New Items Added to Booth Library Collections

    During the month of July, Booth Library acquired and cataloged 839 new titles. The list can be viewed at http://www.library.eiu.edu/newtitles. The list is arranged by location: Ballenger Teachers' Center, Books, Electronic Resources, Illinois and Federal Documents, Maps, Media, Reference Collection, Special Collections and University Archives. The titles are listed by call number within each location. Please contact Karen Whisler, head of Collection Development, at 581-7551 or klwhisler@eiu.edu if you have any questions.
  • Library offers access to hundreds of online-streaming videos

    Thanks to a new database at Booth Library, faculty, staff and students now have access to hundreds of videos that stream online. Through the library's partnership with the Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI), the library added to its collection videos in the areas of American history, counseling, dance, ethnography and LGBT studies produced by Alexander Street Press.

    The video collections include content that's online exclusively through Alexander Street Press from partners such as The History Channel, Bullfrog, Chronoscope, Universal Newsreel, United News and more. Also included are documentaries and series from PBS.

    A majority of the videos available cover American history, including documentaries, newsreels and never-before-published archival footage.

    Eastern faculty members may find these videos useful to supplement teaching materials, illustrate a lecture or include in online courses. Students may use the videos as part of their research or include snippets of videos as part of a multimedia presentation.

    The collections are easily searchable by topic, and include real-time transcripts and an easy-to-use menu to create custom clips of portions of videos.

    These videos may be used just like any other educational video, with the added bonus of being able to view them anytime from almost anywhere.

    For more information about the video collection, contact your subject librarian or call the library reference desk at 581-6072.

    The collection can be browsed by topic at http://vasc.alexanderstreet.com/browse/disciplinetopic

    Individual collections are linked below.

  • Library Open House

    Booth Library invites all students to an open house from 3 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 27.

    Students are encouraged to stop by for free ice cream and other treats. Spin the prize wheel for a chance to win books, note pads, print cards, cups, pencils, bags, EIU clothing and memorabilia, and more.

    “This will be a fun event to welcome students to the library,” said Janice Derr, reference librarian. “We want students to get to know the library staff. We’re here to help.”

    As part of the fun, a green screen will be set up so that students and their friends can pose to create their very own “Read” poster. The finished poster will be sent digitally to the students. Students also will have the opportunity to shoot a 15- to 30-second video explaining what they like about Booth Library.

    Most activities will take place in the atrium on the first floor of the library. Tours will be offered beginning every half-hour from the Marvin Foyer on the north end of the building.
  • General Library Tours

    Booth Library is offering library orientation tours between August 23 and September 25. (The library is closed on September 2, so there will be no tour that day.) Tours meet in the library's North Foyer at the following times:

    Mondays -- 6:00 p.m.
    Tuesdays -- 11:00 a.m.
    Wednesdays -- 5:00 p.m.

    Sessions last approximately 45 minutes. All are welcome to attend. To take a tour, simply go to the Marvin Foyer (inside the north entrance) in Booth Library at the scheduled time. Registration is not required for general tours.

  • Fall book sale planned Sept. 11

    Booth Library on the Eastern Illinois University campus will host a fall book sale from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 11, outside the south entrance of the library.

    A large selection of books in all subject areas and hundreds of paperback fiction titles will be available for sale. All items have been donated by the campus and local communities.

    Library staff requests no sales in advance. The proceeds from the sale are used to enhance library programs and services.

    A book sale is held annually each spring during National Library Week, but a fall sale was added this year due to the large number of available materials.

    In case of inclement weather, the sale will be postponed. For the latest information on scheduling, check for announcements here or find Booth Library on Facebook or Twitter.

  • Oxford Islamic Studies Online database available for limited time

    For a limited time, Booth Library patrons may access Oxford Islamic Studies Online through Booth Library. This resource will be available to the EIU community through Dec. 31, 2014.

    This database is an "authoritative, dynamic resource [that] brings together the best current scholarship in the field … to foster a more accurate and informed understanding of the Islamic world. Oxford Islamic Studies Online features reference content and commentary by renowned scholars in areas such as global Islamic history, concepts, people, practices, politics and culture, and is regularly updated…"

    The database includes reference entries, primary source documents, learning resources, and images and maps. Click here to link to this resource.

    Access to Oxford Islamic Studies Online is part of the Let's Talk About It: Muslim Journeys series. Booth Library is one of 125 libraries and state humanities councils across the country selected to participate in the project, which seeks to familiarize public audiences in the United States with the people, places, history, faith and cultures of Muslims in the United States and around the world. In addition to receiving access to Oxford Islamic Studies Online, Booth Library will host a five-part, scholar-led discussion series on the theme "Pathways of Faith" during the spring 2014 semester.

    Books in the series are The Children of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity, Islam by F.E. Peters, Muhammad: A Very Short Introduction by Jonathan A.C. Brown, The Story of the Qur'an: Its History and Place in Muslim Life by Ingrid Mattson, The Art of Hajj by Venetia Porter, and A Rumi Anthology edited and translated by Reynold A. Nicholson. Scholars for the series are Brian Mann, assistant professor of history, and Jay Shinde, assistant professor of accountancy. For more information and to register, email Duffin, project director, at kduffin@eiu.edu or click here to visit the library webpage.

    Let's Talk About It: Muslim Journeys, a reading and discussion series, has been made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities in cooperation with the American Library Association.

  • 1,038 New Items Added to Booth Library Collections

    During August, Booth Library acquired and cataloged 1,038 new titles. The list can be viewed at http://www.library.eiu.edu/newtitles. The list is arranged by location: Ballenger Teachers' Center, Books, Electronic Resources, Illinois and Federal Documents, Maps, Media, Reference Collection, Special Collections and University Archives. The titles are listed by call number within each location. Please contact Karen Whisler, head of Collection Development, at 581-7551 or klwhisler@eiu.edu if you have any questions.
  • Story time:

    band members

    The EIU CrossBones will present a program titled 1234: Solos, Duets, Trios, Quartets at Booth Library's story time as part of Eastern Illinois University Family Weekend. The program will begin at 10 a.m. Sept 28.

    The free program will include music and readings for ages 2 to 10 and their families. Children will then be allowed to experiment with the musical instruments as part of an "instrument petting zoo." Activities will take place in the reference room in the northwest corner of the library.

    Members of the EIU CrossBones are Cameron Aldrich, Andy Ambrose, Aaron Eckert, Jaime Escatel, Jennette Grau, Tyler Harr, Royce Harrington, Max Kestner and Mark Rheaume on tenor trombones; and Bill Mitchell and Michael Pond-Jones on bass trombones. The group is directed by Jemmie Robertson, tenor and bass trombonist and assistant professor of music.

    The public is invited to attend this program, which is coordinated by staff at the Ballenger Teachers Center at Booth Library. For more information about the Ballenger Teachers Center, visit http://www.library.eiu.edu/btc/ or call 581-8442.

  • 'Literature of Prescription' exhibit and programs announced

    Booth Library will present Literature of Prescription: Charlotte Perkins Gilman and 'The Yellow Wall-Paper' from Sept. 23 through Nov. 2.

    This exhibit and programs will examine a 19th-century writer's challenge to the medical profession and the relationship between science and society. Artist and writer Charlotte Perkins Gilman was discouraged by her doctor from pursuing a career in order to preserve her health. Gilman rejected this idea in a terrifying short story titled The Yellow Wall-Paper. The famous tale served as an indictment of the medical profession and the social conventions restricting women's professional and creative opportunities.

    Literature of Prescription will include national and local exhibits, lectures and a film screening. Faculty and staff from the EIU departments of English, art, women's studies and the library will participate, in addition to the EIU Counseling Center.

    The public is invited to attend all programs in this series. For more information and a complete schedule of events for Literature of Prescription, visit the program web page.

    The national exhibition was developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

  • Booth Library story times for kids offered on Saturdays

    A series of story times for children is planned in the Ballenger Teachers Center at Booth Library on the Eastern Illinois University campus.

    Children ages 3 to 7 are invited to attend the story times from 10 to 11 a.m. on Oct. 5, 12, 26 and Nov. 2, 9 and 16. Programs will feature stories, crafts and activities. All children must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

    For more information about the Ballenger Teachers Center at Booth Library, visit the website or call 581-8442.

  • Try It! Illinois

    Illinois State Library's annual statewide database trial, October 1 through November 30. Try-It! Illinois is open to all Illinois library staffs and Illinois library users. You must have a valid panther card to access Try It! Illinois from EIU. Please see the instructions for more information on accessing the trial.
  • 742 New Items Added to Booth Library Collections

    During September, Booth Library acquired and cataloged 742 new titles. The list can be viewed at http://www.library.eiu.edu/newtitles. The list is arranged by location: Ballenger Teachers' Center, Books, Electronic Resources, Illinois and Federal Documents, Maps, Media, Reference Collection, Special Collections and University Archives. The titles are listed by call number within each location. Please contact Karen Whisler, head of Collection Development, at 581-7551 or klwhisler@eiu.edu if you have any questions.
  • Government Shutdown and Booth Library

    The current government shutdown continues to affect access to government sponsored websites and databases like ERIC (Education Resource Information Center), Medline and PubMed.

    In ERIC, while the majority of fulltext articles are still available, certain fulltext reports and other materials may not be accessible. Ask Reference Services for assistance in locating available articles. Medline, Medline Plus and PubMed are operating with reduced staffing, so new records are being added more slowly.

    For more information on the government shutdown, visit www.USA.gov

    More links to information about the shutdown:

    Pew Research Center: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2013/10/02/federal-government-shutdown-the-data-casualties/

    Please call Reference Services at 217-581-6072 if you have a specific question related to Library Services.

  • NoteBooth newsletter now available

    The current issue of NoteBooth, the newsletter of Booth Library, is available at www.library.eiu.edu/notebooth. Remember to visit us for our Yellow Wall-paper exhibits and events! In an effort to conserve resources, NoteBooth is no longer distributed in print.
  • Open Access Week

    Open Access Week will be celebrated throughout the world from Oct. 21-27, and Booth Library is observing the global event by highlighting its institutional online repository, The Keep.

    "Open access" refers to free, immediate, online access to information -- specifically, scholarly research -- and the right to use and re-use that information as needed. Proponents of open access believe it has the potential to increase the exposure and use of published research and enhance the ability to conduct research.

    EIU has supported the move toward open access by implementing The Keep, the university's institutional repository. The Keep, accessible through the Booth Library website or by clicking here, was implemented in September 2011 to provide digital access to scholarly research and local archival materials.

    The Keep provides free and open access to the scholarship of EIU faculty, staff and students, as well as to important documents of EIU history. These materials include master's theses, faculty research and local archives such as copies of The Warbler yearbook and materials from theatre arts productions.

    In the two years since The Keep was implemented, more than 27,000 documents have been added to the database, and those documents have been downloaded more than 123,000 times, making it the second largest repository in Illinois and among the largest in the Midwest. Documents have been accessed from throughout the United States and 133 countries.

    For more information about Open Access Week or The Keep, contact Todd Bruns, institutional repository librarian, at 581-8381 or email thekeep@eiu.edu.

  • 1,100 New Items Added to Booth Library Collections

    During October, Booth Library acquired and cataloged 1,100 new titles. The list can be viewed at http://www.library.eiu.edu/newtitles. The list is arranged by location: Ballenger Teachers' Center, Books, Electronic Resources, Illinois and Federal Documents, Maps, Media, Reference Collection, Special Collections and University Archives. The titles are listed by call number within each location. Please contact Karen Whisler, head of Collection Development, at 581-7551 or klwhisler@eiu.edu if you have any questions.
  • Let's Talk About It: Muslim Journeys

    Booth Library is presenting Let's Talk About It: Muslim Journeys, a reading and discussion series, through April 15. The library is one of 125 libraries and state humanities councils across the country selected to participate in the project, which seeks to familiarize public audiences in the United States with the people, places, history, faith and cultures of Muslims in the United States and around the world.

    Booth Library will host a five-part, scholar-led discussion series on the theme Pathways of Faith, in addition to exhibits and other related programming.

    Books in the series are The Children of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity, Islam by F.E. Peters, Muhammad: A Very Short Introduction by Jonathan A.C. Brown, The Story of the Qur'an: Its History and Place in Muslim Life by Ingrid Mattson, The Art of Hajj by Venetia Porter, and A Rumi Anthology edited and translated by Reynold A. Nicholson. Book discussions will be led by Brian Mann, Dr. Jaysinha Shinde and Dr. Ahmed Abou-Zaid.

    In addition to the book discussions, related exhibits are on display at Booth Library and the Tarble Arts Center. Other upcoming programs include student research presentations; an interfaith panel moderated by instructor Daniel Otto; and a panel discussion, Women in Veil, moderated by Dr. Bonnie Irwin. For the complete schedule visit the website.

    In addition to the Muslim Journeys discussion and program series, Booth Library patrons can access Oxford Islamic Studies Online for a limited time. This resource will be available to the EIU community through Dec. 31, 2014. The database includes reference entries, primary source documents, learning resources, and images and maps. Click here to link to this resource.

    Let's Talk About It: Muslim Journeys has been made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities in cooperation with the American Library Association. Photos and other materials from this program series are available here.

  • Students: Win cash prizes for your research work

    Students who have used Booth Library and archival resources to enhance their research are encouraged to enter the library's "Awards for Excellence in Student Research and Creativity" program.

    The program is open to all EIU students. Each award consists of a certificate and a cash prize (up to $300). Certificates of Merit or Honorable Mention may be presented to selected additional entries.

    The 2014 guidelines, application and entry form can be found here. For more information, call 581-6061.

    Entries should be delivered to the Administration Office, Room 4700, Booth Library, no later than March 17. Recipients will be selected by April 9, and the winners will be announced during National Library Week, April 13-19. Works submitted for competition must have been completed within the last 12 months.

    These awards are not intended to duplicate or replace any other standing campus awards. Selected entries will become a part of Booth Library's Student Research and Creativity Collection.

  • General Library Tours

    Booth Library is offering library orientation tours between January 7 and February 14. (The library is closed on January 21, so there will be no tour that day.) Tours meet in the library's North Foyer at the following times: Mondays -- 6 p.m. Tuesdays -- 11 a.m. Wednesdays -- 5 p.m. Thursdays -- 1:00 p.m. Sessions last approximately 45 minutes. All are welcome to attend. To take a tour, simply go to the Marvin Foyer (inside the north entrance) in Booth Library at the scheduled time. Registration is not required for general tours.